1. Wolfe, N. (2011). The living organization: Transforming business to create extraordinary results. Irvine, CA: Quantum Leaders Publishing. Introduction Chapter 1, “A Shock to Our System” Chapter 2, “The Living Organization®: The Secret of Life” Appendix Norman Wolfe argues that a fundamental shift in the way people think about organizations is needed if they are to produce extraordinary results and make a positive difference in the world. Wolfe offers an insightful strategic framework that presents how leaders can build “Living Organizations” that are rooted deeply within a Soulful Purpose, and who build cultures that value open collaboration, effective real-time teamwork, build off the energy of empowered and engaged people, all while seeking to create value for both shareholders and the more broad set of stakeholders. 2. Courtney, H., Lovallo, D., & Clarke, C. (2013). Deciding how to decide. Harvard Business Review, 91(11), 62–70. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636584/3d4000793c465ea85d06bfa58c6bad00 Most strategic decisions must be made under conditions of great uncertainty, and many finance and budgeting processes assume certainty, so other tools must be considered. This article provides a perspective for matching decision-making tools to the decision being made, on the basis of three factors: how well you understand the variables that will determine success, how well you can predict the range of possible outcomes, and how centralized the relevant information is. 3. Galunic, C., & Hermreck, I. (2012). How to help employees “get” strategy. Harvard Business Review, 90(12), 24. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636585/ae41ff9030ccebc1c3adcd9b7caf5062 This article explores how senior leaders can better communicate and establish an “embeddedness” to organizational strategy that goes beyond the simple “top down” cascade approach. 4. Koehn, N. (2013). The brain—and soul—of capitalism. Harvard Business Review, 91(11), 44. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636586/ae585587c4e87648e404e496370d7526 The author suggests that organizations must think beyond the simple bottom line in order to thrive in today’s global realities. 5. Martin, R. L. (2014). The big lie of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review, 92(1/2), 78–84. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636587/12d4416ced57860110c655f59e576a8c Strategy making forces executives to confront a future they can only guess at. It is not surprising, then, that they try to make the task less daunting by preparing a comprehensive plan for how the company will achieve its goal. But good strategy is not the product of endless research and modeling; it’s the result of a simple process of thinking through how to hit a target and whether it’s realistic to try. Discomfort is part of the process. 6. Porter, M., & Kramer, M. (2006). Strategy & society: The link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility. Harvard Business Review, 84(12), 78–92. https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28644109/e39b049f414c49458fa405e570949408 In this article, Porter and Kramer challenge the notion that business and social responsibility are in opposition to each other. Instead, they discuss how companies can pursue corporate social responsibility strategically—and not in a fragmented manner—to unlock benefits for business and society. As you read this article, consider if business and corporate social responsibility are at tension with each other, or if they support sustainable competitive strategies. 7. Zenger, T. (2013). What is the theory of your firm? Harvard Business Review, 91(6), 72–78. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636588/25c4d3aed2a194f16a5fc5c648c74c98 Zenger argues that managers’ most vexing strategic challenge is not how to win or sustain competitive advantage, but, rather, how to keep creating value. He offers what he calls the corporate theory, which reveals how a given company can do just that. Drawing on the history of Disney and Apple, he describes what makes a corporate theory strong, shows how it informs strategic choices, and warns what can happen when a company loses sight of its theory.

 
 
  1. Wolfe, N. (2011). The living organization: Transforming business to create extraordinary results. Irvine, CA: Quantum Leaders Publishing.

 

Introduction

Chapter 1, “A Shock to Our System”

Chapter 2, “The Living Organization®: The Secret of Life”

Appendix

 

Norman Wolfe argues that a fundamental shift in the way people think about organizations is needed if they are to produce extraordinary results and make a positive difference in the world. Wolfe offers an insightful strategic framework that presents how leaders can build “Living Organizations” that are rooted deeply within a Soulful Purpose, and who build cultures that value open collaboration, effective real-time teamwork, build off the energy of empowered and engaged people, all while seeking to create value for both shareholders and the more broad set of stakeholders.

  1. Courtney, H., Lovallo, D., & Clarke, C. (2013). Deciding how to decide. Harvard Business Review, 91(11), 62–70. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636584/3d4000793c465ea85d06bfa58c6bad00

 

Most strategic decisions must be made under conditions of great uncertainty, and many finance and budgeting processes assume certainty, so other tools must be considered. This article provides a perspective for matching decision-making tools to the decision being made, on the basis of three factors: how well you understand the variables that will determine success, how well you can predict the range of possible outcomes, and how centralized the relevant information is.

  1. Galunic, C., & Hermreck, I. (2012). How to help employees “get” strategy. Harvard Business Review, 90(12), 24. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636585/ae41ff9030ccebc1c3adcd9b7caf5062

 

This article explores how senior leaders can better communicate and establish an “embeddedness” to organizational strategy that goes beyond the simple “top down” cascade approach.

  1. Koehn, N. (2013). The brain—and soul—of capitalism. Harvard Business Review, 91(11), 44. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636586/ae585587c4e87648e404e496370d7526

 

The author suggests that organizations must think beyond the simple bottom line in order to thrive in today’s global realities.

  1. Martin, R. L. (2014). The big lie of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review, 92(1/2), 78–84. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636587/12d4416ced57860110c655f59e576a8c

 

Strategy making forces executives to confront a future they can only guess at. It is not surprising, then, that they try to make the task less daunting by preparing a comprehensive plan for how the company will achieve its goal. But good strategy is not the product of endless research and modeling; it’s the result of a simple process of thinking through how to hit a target and whether it’s realistic to try. Discomfort is part of the process.

  1. Porter, M., & Kramer, M. (2006). Strategy & society: The link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility. Harvard Business Review, 84(12), 78–92. https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28644109/e39b049f414c49458fa405e570949408

 

In this article, Porter and Kramer challenge the notion that business and social responsibility are in opposition to each other. Instead, they discuss how companies can pursue corporate social responsibility strategically—and not in a fragmented manner—to unlock benefits for business and society. As you read this article, consider if business and corporate social responsibility are at tension with each other, or if they support sustainable competitive strategies.

  1. Zenger, T. (2013). What is the theory of your firm? Harvard Business Review, 91(6), 72–78. Retrieved from https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/pl/28623611/28636588/25c4d3aed2a194f16a5fc5c648c74c98

 

Zenger argues that managers’ most vexing strategic challenge is not how to win or sustain competitive advantage, but, rather, how to keep creating value. He offers what he calls the corporate theory, which reveals how a given company can do just that. Drawing on the history of Disney and Apple, he describes what makes a corporate theory strong, shows how it informs strategic choices, and warns what can happen when a company loses sight of its theory.

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