Exercise 4.19 1. Model the prescription fulfillment process described in Exercise 1.6. Use subprocesses where required, and nest them appropriately. 2. Is there any sub-process that can potentially be shared with other business processes of the same pharmacy, or of other pharmacies? 4.10 Further Exercises 147 Exercise 4.20 Model the business process described in Exercise 3.12 using a loop activity. Exercise 4.21 1. What is the limitation of using a loop activity to model repetition instead of using unstructured cycles? 2. What is the requirement for a sub-process to be used as a loop activity? 3. Model the procure-to-pay process described in Example 1.1. Hint Use the model in Fig. 1.6 as a starting point for item (3). Exercise 4.22 Model the following business process. Mail from the party is collected on a daily basis by the mail processing unit. Within this unit, the mail clerk sorts the unopened mail into the various business areas. The mail is then distributed. When the mail is received by the registry, it is opened and sorted into groups for distribution, and thus registered in a mail register. Afterwards, the assistant registry manager within the registry performs a quality check. If the mail is not compliant, a list of requisitions explaining the reasons for rejection is compiled and sent back to the party. Otherwise, the matter details are captured and provided to the cashier, who takes the applicable fees attached to the mail. At this point, the assistant registry manager puts the receipt and copied documents into an envelope and posts it to the party. Meantime, the cashier captures the party details and prints the physical court file. Exercise 4.23 Model the following process for selecting Nobel prize laureates for chemistry. September: nomination forms are sent out. The Nobel committee sends out confidential forms to around 3,000 people—selected professors at universities around the world, Nobel laureates in physics and chemistry, and members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, among others. February: deadline for submission. The completed nomination forms must reach the Nobel Committee no later than 31 January of the following year. The committee screens the nominations and selects the preliminary candidates. About 250–350 names are nominated as several nominators often submit the same name. March–May: consultation with experts. The Nobel committee sends the list of the preliminary candidates to specially appointed experts for their assessment of the work of the candidates. June–August: writing of the report. The Nobel committee puts together the report with recommendations to be submitted to the Academy. The report is signed by all members of the committee. September: committee submits recommendations. The Nobel committee submits its report with recommendations on the final candidates to the members of the Academy. The report is discussed at two meetings of the chemistry section of the Academy. October: Nobel laureates are chosen. In early October, the Academy selects the Nobel laureates in chemistry through a majority vote. The decision is final and without appeal. The names of the Nobel laureates are then announced. December: Nobel laureates receive their prize. The Nobel prize award ceremony takes place on 10 December in Stockholm, where the Nobel laureates receive their Nobel prize, which consists of a Nobel medal and diploma, and a document confirming the prize amount. 148 4 Advanced Process Modeling Acknowledgement This exercise is taken from “Nomination and Selection of Chemistry Laureates”, Nobelprize.org. 29 Feb 2012 (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_ prizes/chemistry/nomination). Exercise 4.24 1. What is the difference between throwing and catching events? 2. What is the meaning of an event attached to an activity’s boundary and what events can be attached to an activity’s boundary? 3. What is the difference between the untyped end event and the terminate end event. Exercise 4.25 What is wrong with the following model? Exercise 4.26 Extend the billing process model seen in Exercise 4.7 as follows. Any time after the first transaction has failed, the customer may pay the invoice directly to the ISP. If so, the billing process is interrupted and the payment is registered. This direct payment must also cover the late fees, based on the number of days passed since Day 7 (the last day to avoid incurring late fees). If the direct payment does not include late fees, the ISP sends a notification to the customer that the fees will be charged in the next invoice, before concluding the process. 4.10 Further Exercises 149 Exercise 4.27 What is wrong with the following model? Exercise 4.28 Model the following business process at a supplier. After a supplier notifies a retailer of the approval of a purchase order, the supplier can either receive an order confirmation, an order change or an order cancellation from the retailer. It may happen that no response is received at all. If no response is received after 48 hours, or if an order cancellation is received, the supplier will cancel the order. If an order confirmation is received within 48 hours, the supplier will process the order normally. If an order change is received within 48 hours, the supplier will update the order and ask again the retailer for confirmation. The retailer is allowed to change an order at most three times. Afterwards, the supplier will automatically cancel the order. Exercise 4.29 Revise the model in Exercise 3.9 by using the terminate event. Exercise 4.30 Model the following business process. When a claim is received, it is first registered. After registration, the claim is classified leading to two possible outcomes: simple or complex. If the claim is simple, the insurance policy is checked. For complex claims, both the policy and the damage are checked independently. A possible outcome of the policy check is that the claim is invalid. In this case, any processing is canceled and a letter is sent to the customer. In the case of a complex claim, this implies that the damage checking is canceled if it has not been completed yet. After the check(s), an assessment is performed which may lead to two possible outcomes: positive or negative. If the assessment is positive, the garage is phoned to authorize the repairs and the payment is scheduled (in this order). In any case (whether the outcome is positive or negative), a letter is sent to the customer and the process ends. At any moment after the registration and before the end of the process, the customer may call to modify the details of the claim. If a modification occurs before the payment is scheduled, the claim is classified again (simple or complex) and the process is repeated. If a request to modify the claim is received after the payment is scheduled, the request is rejected. Exercise 4.31 Model the following business process. 150 4 Advanced Process Modeling An order handling process starts when an order is received. The order is first registered. If the current date is not a working day, the process waits until the following working day before proceeding. Otherwise, an availability check is performed and a purchase order response is sent back to the customer. If any item is not available, any processing related to the order must be stopped. Thereafter, the client needs to be notified that the purchase order cannot be further processed. Anytime during the process, the customer may send a purchase order cancel request. When such a request is received, the purchase order handling process is interrupted and the cancellation is processed. The customer may also send a “Customer address change request” during the order handling process. When such a request is received, it is just registered, without further action. Exercise 4.32 1. What is the difference between a collaboration and a choreography diagram? What are the respective modeling objectives? 2. Model the choreography diagram for the collaboration diagram that you modeled in Exercise 3.7. Exercise 4.33 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for electronic land development applications. The Smart Electronic Development Assessment System (Smart eDA) is a Queensland Government initiative aimed to provide an intuitive service for preparing, lodging and assessing land development applications. The land development business process starts with the receipt of a land development application from an applicant. Upon the receipt of a land development application, the assessment manager interacts with the cadastre to retrieve geographical information on the designated development area. This information is used to get an initial validation of the development proposal from the city council. If the plan is valid, the assessment manager sends the applicant a quote of the costs that will incur to process the application. These costs depend on the type of development plan (for residential or commercial purposes), and on the permit/license that will be required for the plan to be approved. If the applicant accepts the quote, the assessment can start. The assessment consists of a detailed analysis of the development plan. First, the assessment manager interacts with the Department of Main Roads (DMR) to check for conflicts with planned road development works. If there are conflicts, the application cannot proceed and must be rejected. In this case, the applicant is notified by the assessment manager. The applicant may wish to modify the development plan and re-submit it for assessment. In this case, the process is resumed from where it was interrupted. If the development plan includes modifications to the natural environment, the assessment manager needs to request a land alteration permit to the Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW). If the plan is for commercial purposes, additional fees will be applied to obtain this permit. Once the permit is granted, this is sent by NRW directly to the applicant. Likewise, if the designated development area is regulated by special environment protection laws, the assessment manager needs to request an environmental license to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Similarly, once the license is granted, this is sent by EPA directly to the applicant. Once the required permit and/or license have been obtained, the assessment manager notifies the Applicant of the final approval. At any time during this process, the applicant can track the progress of their application by interacting directly with the assessment manager. Assessment manager, cadastre, DMR, NRW and EPA are all Queensland Government entities. In particular, NRW and EPA are part of the Department of Environment and Resource Management within the Queensland Government. 4.10 Further Exercises 151 Exercise 4.34 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for ordering maintenance activities at Sparks. The ordering business process starts with the receipt of a request for work order from a customer. Upon the receipt of this request, the ordering department of Sparks estimates the expected usage of supplies, parts and labor and prepares a quote with the estimated total cost for the maintenance activity. If the customer’s vehicle is insured, the ordering department interacts with the insurance department to retrieve the details of the customer’s insurance plan so that these can be attached to the quote. The ordering department then sends the quote to the customer, who can either accept or reject the quote by notifying the ordering department within five days. If the customer accepts the quote, the ordering department contacts the warehouse department to check if the required parts are in stock before scheduling an appointment with the customer. If some parts are not in stock, the ordering department orders the required parts by interacting with a certified reseller and waits for an order confirmation from the reseller, to be received within three days. If it is not received, the order department orders the parts again from a second reseller. If no reply is received from the second reseller too, the order department notifies the customer that the parts are not available and the process terminates. If the required parts are in stock or have been ordered, the ordering department interacts with an external garage to book a suitably equipped service bay and a suitably qualified mechanic to perform the work. A confirmation of the appointment is then sent by the garage to the order department which forwards the confirmation to the customer. The customer has one week to pay Sparks, otherwise the ordering department cancels the work order by sending a cancellation notice to both the service bay and the mechanic that have been booked for this order. If the customer pays in time, the work order is performed. Exercise 4.35 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process at MetalWorks. Keep in mind that the purpose of this BPMN diagram is to serve as a means of communication between the business stakeholders and the IT team who has to build a software system to automate this process. A build-to-order (BTO) process, also known as make-to-order process, is an “order-to-cash” process where the products to be sold are manufactured on the basis of a confirmed purchase order. In other words, the manufacturer does not maintain any ready-to-ship products in their stock. Instead, the products are manufactured on demand when the customer orders them. This approach is used in the context of customized products, such as metallurgical products, where customers often submit orders for products with very specific requirements. We consider a BTO process at a company called MetalWorks. The process starts when MetalWorks receives a purchase order (PO) from one of its customers. This PO is called the “customer PO”. The customer PO may contain one or multiple line items. Each line item refers to a different product. Upon receiving a customer PO, a sales officer checks the PO to determine if all the line items in the order can be produced within the timeframes indicated in the PO. As a result of this check, the sales officer may either confirm the customer PO or ask the customer to revise the terms of the PO (for example: change the delivery date to a later date). In some extreme cases, the sales officer may reject the PO, but this happens very rarely. If the customer is asked to revise the PO, the BTO process will be put in “stand-by” until the customer submits a revised PO. The sales officer will then check the revised PO and either accept it, reject it, or ask again the customer to make further changes. Once a PO is confirmed, the sales officer creates one “work order” for each line item in the customer PO. In other words, one customer PO gives place to multiple work orders (one per line item). The work order is a document that allows employees at MetalWorks to keep track of the manufacturing of a product requested by a customer. 152 4 Advanced Process Modeling In order to manufacture a product, multiple raw materials are typically required. Some of these raw materials are maintained in stock in the warehouse of MetalWorks, but others need to be sourced from one or multiple suppliers. Accordingly, each work order is examined by a production engineer. The production engineer determines which raw materials are required in order to fulfill the work order. The production engineer annotates the work order with a list of required raw materials. Each raw material listed in the work order is later checked by a procurement officer. The procurement officer determines whether the required raw material is available in stock, or it has to be ordered. If the material has to be ordered, the procurement officer selects a suitable supplier for the raw material and sends a PO to the selected supplier. This “PO for a raw material” is called a “material PO”, and it is different from the customer PO. A material PO is a PO sent by MetalWorks to one of its suppliers, whereas a customer PO is a PO received by MetalWorks from one of its customers. Once all materials required to fulfill a work order are available, the production can start. The responsibility for the production of a work order is assigned to the same production engineer who previously examined the work order. The production engineer is responsible for scheduling the production. Once the product has been manufactured, it is checked by a quality inspector. Sometimes, the quality inspector finds a defect in the product and reports it to the production engineer. The production engineer then decides whether: (i) the product should undergo a minor fix; or (ii) the product should be discarded and manufactured again. Once the production has completed, the product is shipped to the customer. There is no need to wait until all the line items requested in a customer PO are ready before shipping them. As soon as a product is ready, it can be shipped to the corresponding customer. At any point in time (before the shipment of the product), the customer may send a “cancel order” message for a given PO. When this happens, the sales officer determines if the order can still be canceled, and if so, whether or not the customer should pay a penalty. If the order can be canceled without penalty, all the work related to that order is stopped and the customer is notified that the cancellation has been successful. If the customer needs to pay a penalty, the sales officer first asks the customer if they accept to pay the cancellation penalty. If the customer accepts to pay the cancellation penalty, the order is canceled and all work related to the order is stopped. Otherwise, the work related to the order continues.

 
 

Exercise 4.19 1. Model the prescription fulfillment process described in Exercise 1.6. Use subprocesses where required, and nest them appropriately. 2. Is there any sub-process that can potentially be shared with other business processes of the same pharmacy, or of other pharmacies? 4.10 Further Exercises 147 Exercise 4.20 Model the business process described in Exercise 3.12 using a loop activity. Exercise 4.21 1. What is the limitation of using a loop activity to model repetition instead of using unstructured cycles? 2. What is the requirement for a sub-process to be used as a loop activity? 3. Model the procure-to-pay process described in Example 1.1. Hint Use the model in Fig. 1.6 as a starting point for item (3). Exercise 4.22 Model the following business process. Mail from the party is collected on a daily basis by the mail processing unit. Within this unit, the mail clerk sorts the unopened mail into the various business areas. The mail is then distributed. When the mail is received by the registry, it is opened and sorted into groups for distribution, and thus registered in a mail register. Afterwards, the assistant registry manager within the registry performs a quality check. If the mail is not compliant, a list of requisitions explaining the reasons for rejection is compiled and sent back to the party. Otherwise, the matter details are captured and provided to the cashier, who takes the applicable fees attached to the mail. At this point, the assistant registry manager puts the receipt and copied documents into an envelope and posts it to the party. Meantime, the cashier captures the party details and prints the physical court file. Exercise 4.23 Model the following process for selecting Nobel prize laureates for chemistry. September: nomination forms are sent out. The Nobel committee sends out confidential forms to around 3,000 people—selected professors at universities around the world, Nobel laureates in physics and chemistry, and members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, among others. February: deadline for submission. The completed nomination forms must reach the Nobel Committee no later than 31 January of the following year. The committee screens the nominations and selects the preliminary candidates. About 250–350 names are nominated as several nominators often submit the same name. March–May: consultation with experts. The Nobel committee sends the list of the preliminary candidates to specially appointed experts for their assessment of the work of the candidates. June–August: writing of the report. The Nobel committee puts together the report with recommendations to be submitted to the Academy. The report is signed by all members of the committee. September: committee submits recommendations. The Nobel committee submits its report with recommendations on the final candidates to the members of the Academy. The report is discussed at two meetings of the chemistry section of the Academy. October: Nobel laureates are chosen. In early October, the Academy selects the Nobel laureates in chemistry through a majority vote. The decision is final and without appeal. The names of the Nobel laureates are then announced. December: Nobel laureates receive their prize. The Nobel prize award ceremony takes place on 10 December in Stockholm, where the Nobel laureates receive their Nobel prize, which consists of a Nobel medal and diploma, and a document confirming the prize amount. 148 4 Advanced Process Modeling Acknowledgement This exercise is taken from “Nomination and Selection of Chemistry Laureates”, Nobelprize.org. 29 Feb 2012 (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_ prizes/chemistry/nomination). Exercise 4.24 1. What is the difference between throwing and catching events? 2. What is the meaning of an event attached to an activity’s boundary and what events can be attached to an activity’s boundary? 3. What is the difference between the untyped end event and the terminate end event. Exercise 4.25 What is wrong with the following model? Exercise 4.26 Extend the billing process model seen in Exercise 4.7 as follows. Any time after the first transaction has failed, the customer may pay the invoice directly to the ISP. If so, the billing process is interrupted and the payment is registered. This direct payment must also cover the late fees, based on the number of days passed since Day 7 (the last day to avoid incurring late fees). If the direct payment does not include late fees, the ISP sends a notification to the customer that the fees will be charged in the next invoice, before concluding the process. 4.10 Further Exercises 149 Exercise 4.27 What is wrong with the following model? Exercise 4.28 Model the following business process at a supplier. After a supplier notifies a retailer of the approval of a purchase order, the supplier can either receive an order confirmation, an order change or an order cancellation from the retailer. It may happen that no response is received at all. If no response is received after 48 hours, or if an order cancellation is received, the supplier will cancel the order. If an order confirmation is received within 48 hours, the supplier will process the order normally. If an order change is received within 48 hours, the supplier will update the order and ask again the retailer for confirmation. The retailer is allowed to change an order at most three times. Afterwards, the supplier will automatically cancel the order. Exercise 4.29 Revise the model in Exercise 3.9 by using the terminate event. Exercise 4.30 Model the following business process. When a claim is received, it is first registered. After registration, the claim is classified leading to two possible outcomes: simple or complex. If the claim is simple, the insurance policy is checked. For complex claims, both the policy and the damage are checked independently. A possible outcome of the policy check is that the claim is invalid. In this case, any processing is canceled and a letter is sent to the customer. In the case of a complex claim, this implies that the damage checking is canceled if it has not been completed yet. After the check(s), an assessment is performed which may lead to two possible outcomes: positive or negative. If the assessment is positive, the garage is phoned to authorize the repairs and the payment is scheduled (in this order). In any case (whether the outcome is positive or negative), a letter is sent to the customer and the process ends. At any moment after the registration and before the end of the process, the customer may call to modify the details of the claim. If a modification occurs before the payment is scheduled, the claim is classified again (simple or complex) and the process is repeated. If a request to modify the claim is received after the payment is scheduled, the request is rejected. Exercise 4.31 Model the following business process. 150 4 Advanced Process Modeling An order handling process starts when an order is received. The order is first registered. If the current date is not a working day, the process waits until the following working day before proceeding. Otherwise, an availability check is performed and a purchase order response is sent back to the customer. If any item is not available, any processing related to the order must be stopped. Thereafter, the client needs to be notified that the purchase order cannot be further processed. Anytime during the process, the customer may send a purchase order cancel request. When such a request is received, the purchase order handling process is interrupted and the cancellation is processed. The customer may also send a “Customer address change request” during the order handling process. When such a request is received, it is just registered, without further action. Exercise 4.32 1. What is the difference between a collaboration and a choreography diagram? What are the respective modeling objectives? 2. Model the choreography diagram for the collaboration diagram that you modeled in Exercise 3.7. Exercise 4.33 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for electronic land development applications. The Smart Electronic Development Assessment System (Smart eDA) is a Queensland Government initiative aimed to provide an intuitive service for preparing, lodging and assessing land development applications. The land development business process starts with the receipt of a land development application from an applicant. Upon the receipt of a land development application, the assessment manager interacts with the cadastre to retrieve geographical information on the designated development area. This information is used to get an initial validation of the development proposal from the city council. If the plan is valid, the assessment manager sends the applicant a quote of the costs that will incur to process the application. These costs depend on the type of development plan (for residential or commercial purposes), and on the permit/license that will be required for the plan to be approved. If the applicant accepts the quote, the assessment can start. The assessment consists of a detailed analysis of the development plan. First, the assessment manager interacts with the Department of Main Roads (DMR) to check for conflicts with planned road development works. If there are conflicts, the application cannot proceed and must be rejected. In this case, the applicant is notified by the assessment manager. The applicant may wish to modify the development plan and re-submit it for assessment. In this case, the process is resumed from where it was interrupted. If the development plan includes modifications to the natural environment, the assessment manager needs to request a land alteration permit to the Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW). If the plan is for commercial purposes, additional fees will be applied to obtain this permit. Once the permit is granted, this is sent by NRW directly to the applicant. Likewise, if the designated development area is regulated by special environment protection laws, the assessment manager needs to request an environmental license to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Similarly, once the license is granted, this is sent by EPA directly to the applicant. Once the required permit and/or license have been obtained, the assessment manager notifies the Applicant of the final approval. At any time during this process, the applicant can track the progress of their application by interacting directly with the assessment manager. Assessment manager, cadastre, DMR, NRW and EPA are all Queensland Government entities. In particular, NRW and EPA are part of the Department of Environment and Resource Management within the Queensland Government. 4.10 Further Exercises 151 Exercise 4.34 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for ordering maintenance activities at Sparks. The ordering business process starts with the receipt of a request for work order from a customer. Upon the receipt of this request, the ordering department of Sparks estimates the expected usage of supplies, parts and labor and prepares a quote with the estimated total cost for the maintenance activity. If the customer’s vehicle is insured, the ordering department interacts with the insurance department to retrieve the details of the customer’s insurance plan so that these can be attached to the quote. The ordering department then sends the quote to the customer, who can either accept or reject the quote by notifying the ordering department within five days. If the customer accepts the quote, the ordering department contacts the warehouse department to check if the required parts are in stock before scheduling an appointment with the customer. If some parts are not in stock, the ordering department orders the required parts by interacting with a certified reseller and waits for an order confirmation from the reseller, to be received within three days. If it is not received, the order department orders the parts again from a second reseller. If no reply is received from the second reseller too, the order department notifies the customer that the parts are not available and the process terminates. If the required parts are in stock or have been ordered, the ordering department interacts with an external garage to book a suitably equipped service bay and a suitably qualified mechanic to perform the work. A confirmation of the appointment is then sent by the garage to the order department which forwards the confirmation to the customer. The customer has one week to pay Sparks, otherwise the ordering department cancels the work order by sending a cancellation notice to both the service bay and the mechanic that have been booked for this order. If the customer pays in time, the work order is performed. Exercise 4.35 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process at MetalWorks. Keep in mind that the purpose of this BPMN diagram is to serve as a means of communication between the business stakeholders and the IT team who has to build a software system to automate this process. A build-to-order (BTO) process, also known as make-to-order process, is an “order-to-cash” process where the products to be sold are manufactured on the basis of a confirmed purchase order. In other words, the manufacturer does not maintain any ready-to-ship products in their stock. Instead, the products are manufactured on demand when the customer orders them. This approach is used in the context of customized products, such as metallurgical products, where customers often submit orders for products with very specific requirements. We consider a BTO process at a company called MetalWorks. The process starts when MetalWorks receives a purchase order (PO) from one of its customers. This PO is called the “customer PO”. The customer PO may contain one or multiple line items. Each line item refers to a different product. Upon receiving a customer PO, a sales officer checks the PO to determine if all the line items in the order can be produced within the timeframes indicated in the PO. As a result of this check, the sales officer may either confirm the customer PO or ask the customer to revise the terms of the PO (for example: change the delivery date to a later date). In some extreme cases, the sales officer may reject the PO, but this happens very rarely. If the customer is asked to revise the PO, the BTO process will be put in “stand-by” until the customer submits a revised PO. The sales officer will then check the revised PO and either accept it, reject it, or ask again the customer to make further changes. Once a PO is confirmed, the sales officer creates one “work order” for each line item in the customer PO. In other words, one customer PO gives place to multiple work orders (one per line item). The work order is a document that allows employees at MetalWorks to keep track of the manufacturing of a product requested by a customer. 152 4 Advanced Process Modeling In order to manufacture a product, multiple raw materials are typically required. Some of these raw materials are maintained in stock in the warehouse of MetalWorks, but others need to be sourced from one or multiple suppliers. Accordingly, each work order is examined by a production engineer. The production engineer determines which raw materials are required in order to fulfill the work order. The production engineer annotates the work order with a list of required raw materials. Each raw material listed in the work order is later checked by a procurement officer. The procurement officer determines whether the required raw material is available in stock, or it has to be ordered. If the material has to be ordered, the procurement officer selects a suitable supplier for the raw material and sends a PO to the selected supplier. This “PO for a raw material” is called a “material PO”, and it is different from the customer PO. A material PO is a PO sent by MetalWorks to one of its suppliers, whereas a customer PO is a PO received by MetalWorks from one of its customers. Once all materials required to fulfill a work order are available, the production can start. The responsibility for the production of a work order is assigned to the same production engineer who previously examined the work order. The production engineer is responsible for scheduling the production. Once the product has been manufactured, it is checked by a quality inspector. Sometimes, the quality inspector finds a defect in the product and reports it to the production engineer. The production engineer then decides whether: (i) the product should undergo a minor fix; or (ii) the product should be discarded and manufactured again. Once the production has completed, the product is shipped to the customer. There is no need to wait until all the line items requested in a customer PO are ready before shipping them. As soon as a product is ready, it can be shipped to the corresponding customer. At any point in time (before the shipment of the product), the customer may send a “cancel order” message for a given PO. When this happens, the sales officer determines if the order can still be canceled, and if so, whether or not the customer should pay a penalty. If the order can be canceled without penalty, all the work related to that order is stopped and the customer is notified that the cancellation has been successful. If the customer needs to pay a penalty, the sales officer first asks the customer if they accept to pay the cancellation penalty. If the customer accepts to pay the cancellation penalty, the order is canceled and all work related to the order is stopped. Otherwise, the work related to the order continues.

order btn