Exercise 4.33 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for electronic land development applications. The Smart Electronic Development Assessment System (Smart eDA) is a Queensland Government initiative aimed to provide an intuitive service for preparing, lodging and assessing land development applications. The land development business process starts with the receipt of a land development application from an applicant. Upon the receipt of a land development application, the assessment manager interacts with the cadastre to retrieve geographical information on the designated development area. This information is used to get an initial validation of the development proposal from the city council. If the plan is valid, the assessment manager sends the applicant a quote of the costs that will incur to process the application. These costs depend on the type of development plan (for residential or commercial purposes), and on the permit/license that will be required for the plan to be approved. If the applicant accepts the quote, the assessment can start. The assessment consists of a detailed analysis of the development plan. First, the assessment manager interacts with the Department of Main Roads (DMR) to check for conflicts with planned road development works. If there are conflicts, the application cannot proceed and must be rejected. In this case, the applicant is notified by the assessment manager. The applicant may wish to modify the development plan and re-submit it for assessment. In this case, the process is resumed from where it was interrupted. If the development plan includes modifications to the natural environment, the assessment manager needs to request a land alteration permit to the Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW). If the plan is for commercial purposes, additional fees will be applied to obtain this permit. Once the permit is granted, this is sent by NRW directly to the applicant. Likewise, if the designated development area is regulated by special environment protection laws, the assessment manager needs to request an environmental license to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Similarly, once the license is granted, this is sent by EPA directly to the applicant. Once the required permit and/or license have been obtained, the assessment manager notifies the Applicant of the final approval. At any time during this process, the applicant can track the progress of their application by interacting directly with the assessment manager. Assessment manager, cadastre, DMR, NRW and EPA are all Queensland Government entities. In particular, NRW and EPA are part of the Department of Environment and Resource Management within the Queensland Government.

 
 

Exercise 4.33 Model the choreography and collaboration diagrams for the following business process for electronic land development applications. The Smart Electronic Development Assessment System (Smart eDA) is a Queensland Government initiative aimed to provide an intuitive service for preparing, lodging and assessing land development applications. The land development business process starts with the receipt of a land development application from an applicant. Upon the receipt of a land development application, the assessment manager interacts with the cadastre to retrieve geographical information on the designated development area. This information is used to get an initial validation of the development proposal from the city council. If the plan is valid, the assessment manager sends the applicant a quote of the costs that will incur to process the application. These costs depend on the type of development plan (for residential or commercial purposes), and on the permit/license that will be required for the plan to be approved. If the applicant accepts the quote, the assessment can start. The assessment consists of a detailed analysis of the development plan. First, the assessment manager interacts with the Department of Main Roads (DMR) to check for conflicts with planned road development works. If there are conflicts, the application cannot proceed and must be rejected. In this case, the applicant is notified by the assessment manager. The applicant may wish to modify the development plan and re-submit it for assessment. In this case, the process is resumed from where it was interrupted. If the development plan includes modifications to the natural environment, the assessment manager needs to request a land alteration permit to the Department of Natural Resources and Water (NRW). If the plan is for commercial purposes, additional fees will be applied to obtain this permit. Once the permit is granted, this is sent by NRW directly to the applicant. Likewise, if the designated development area is regulated by special environment protection laws, the assessment manager needs to request an environmental license to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Similarly, once the license is granted, this is sent by EPA directly to the applicant. Once the required permit and/or license have been obtained, the assessment manager notifies the Applicant of the final approval. At any time during this process, the applicant can track the progress of their application by interacting directly with the assessment manager. Assessment manager, cadastre, DMR, NRW and EPA are all Queensland Government entities. In particular, NRW and EPA are part of the Department of Environment and Resource Management within the Queensland Government.

order btn