Guided Response: Navigate through several of your classmate’s selected schools or programs that the Instructor provided and respond to at least two peers, paying close attention to the particular school or program they featured in their initial discussion post. Review the analysis of the decisions and cultural influences discussed and indicate how you agree or disagree with their analysis. As with previous discussions, though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you. This will further the conversation and provide you with opportunities to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real world experiences with this topic. The inclusion of children with autism is particularly important to discussions about education programs today. Because of the increase in rates of autism, schools and educators will need to adapt appropriately in order to harness the talents of children afflicted with this disorder. Schools today are finding it necessary to implement research-proven methods in educating children with autism, which can often be a time consuming and costly endeavor; certain programs mandate 40 hours per week of one-on-one therapy between a therapist and an autistic child, which can cost a school up to $40,000 per year (Winerman, 2004). There are also a number of legal implications for schools to consider when implementing these programs. Educators are also increasingly turning to parents for advice on how to best deal with children afflicted with varying degrees of autism and Asperger’s Syndrome. Given the costly nature of certain autism programs and the increasing prevalence of children with autism, I believe it will be necessary for schools to experiment with various behavioral intervention strategies and research-proven methods to find the best ways of dealing with each child. References Winderman, L. (2004). “Effective Education for Autism.” Monitor, 35(11), 46.

 
 

Guided Response: Navigate through several of your classmate’s selected schools or programs that the Instructor provided and respond to at least two peers, paying close attention to the particular school or program they featured in their initial discussion post. Review the analysis of the decisions and cultural influences discussed and indicate how you agree or disagree with their analysis. As with previous discussions, though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you. This will further the conversation and provide you with opportunities to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real world experiences with this topic.

The inclusion of children with autism is particularly important to discussions about education programs today. Because of the increase in rates of autism, schools and educators will need to adapt appropriately in order to harness the talents of children afflicted with this disorder. Schools today are finding it necessary to implement research-proven methods in educating children with autism, which can often be a time consuming and costly endeavor; certain programs mandate 40 hours per week of one-on-one therapy between a therapist and an autistic child, which can cost a school up to $40,000 per year (Winerman, 2004). There are also a number of legal implications for schools to consider when implementing these programs. Educators are also increasingly turning to parents for advice on how to best deal with children afflicted with varying degrees of autism and Asperger’s Syndrome. Given the costly nature of certain autism programs and the increasing prevalence of children with autism, I believe it will be necessary for schools to experiment with various behavioral intervention strategies and research-proven methods to find the best ways of dealing with each child.

References

Winderman, L. (2004). “Effective Education for Autism.” Monitor, 35(11), 46.

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