Guided Response: Navigate through several of your classmate’s selected schools or programs that the Instructor provided and respond to at least two peers, paying close attention to the particular school or program they featured in their initial discussion post. Review the analysis of the decisions and cultural influences discussed and indicate how you agree or disagree with their analysis. As with previous discussions, though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you. This will further the conversation and provide you with opportunities to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real world experiences with this topic. ​One of the most important functions of teaching is to provide an effective learning environment for students. On the one hand, it is important for students to learn the core ideas of the class, which are generally a result of standards set by the institution, the district, the state, or a national requirement. On the other hand, what students really need to learn is how to apply what they have learned to the real world. As such, they need to learn how to innovate and function as productive members of society in world that is advancing technologically at a rapid pace and becoming increasingly diverse and globalized. Therefore, it is important for students to understand differing perspectives, as well as learn 21st century skills such as the ability to do effective research, be capable of critical thinking and problem-solving, and be effective collaborators and communicators (English & Kitsantas, 2013). Thus, it is truly important that students learn not just the subject matter or the core ideas of a specific class, but also their implications and applications to the real world. ​Research has found that there are differing preferences and learning styles when it comes to the classroom environment. Therefore, it is necessary for educators to arrange experiences in such a manner as to maximize the probability of successful learning. Given the initial statement, what emerges is that there is no one way or correct approach to this. Rather, the educator needs to understand the value of students as an important stakeholder in their learning experience, and attempt to gain feedback as to their preferences, needs, and barriers to success (Miglietti & Strange, 1998). Thus, educators need to make the curriculum relevant to each student and also enhance student interest and participation in the learning process to improve education levels, learned skills, and retained knowledge (Morrier, Irving, Dandy, Dmitriyev, & Ukeje, 2007). Students must be encouraged to be creative and not be held back by fear of failure. References English, M.C., & Kitsantas, A. (2013). Supporting student self-regulated learning in problem- and project-based learning. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning, 7, 127–150. Miglietti, C. L., & Strange, C. C. (1998). Learning styles, classroom environment preferences, teaching styles, and remedial course outcomes. Community College Review, 26(1), 1-19. Morrier, M. J., Irving, M. A., Dandy, E., Dmitriyev, G., & Ukeje, I. C. (2007). Teaching and learning within and across cultures: Educator requirements across the United States. Multicultural Education, 14(3), 32-40

 
 

Guided Response: Navigate through several of your classmate’s selected schools or programs that the Instructor provided and respond to at least two peers, paying close attention to the particular school or program they featured in their initial discussion post. Review the analysis of the decisions and cultural influences discussed and indicate how you agree or disagree with their analysis. As with previous discussions, though two replies is the basic expectation, for deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions others have given to you. This will further the conversation and provide you with opportunities to demonstrate your content expertise, critical thinking, and real world experiences with this topic.

One of the most important functions of teaching is to provide an effective learning environment for students. On the one hand, it is important for students to learn the core ideas of the class, which are generally a result of standards set by the institution, the district, the state, or a national requirement. On the other hand, what students really need to learn is how to apply what they have learned to the real world. As such, they need to learn how to innovate and function as productive members of society in world that is advancing technologically at a rapid pace and becoming increasingly diverse and globalized. Therefore, it is important for students to understand differing perspectives, as well as learn 21st century skills such as the ability to do effective research, be capable of critical thinking and problem-solving, and be effective collaborators and communicators (English & Kitsantas, 2013). Thus, it is truly important that students learn not just the subject matter or the core ideas of a specific class, but also their implications and applications to the real world. Research has found that there are differing preferences and learning styles when it comes to the classroom environment. Therefore, it is necessary for educators to arrange experiences in such a manner as to maximize the probability of successful learning. Given the initial statement, what emerges is that there is no one way or correct approach to this. Rather, the educator needs to understand the value of students as an important stakeholder in their learning experience, and attempt to gain feedback as to their preferences, needs, and barriers to success (Miglietti & Strange, 1998). Thus, educators need to make the curriculum relevant to each student and also enhance student interest and participation in the learning process to improve education levels, learned skills, and retained knowledge (Morrier, Irving, Dandy, Dmitriyev, & Ukeje, 2007). Students must be encouraged to be creative and not be held back by fear of failure. References English, M.C., & Kitsantas, A. (2013). Supporting student self-regulated learning in problem- and project-based learning. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning, 7, 127–150. Miglietti, C. L., & Strange, C. C. (1998). Learning styles, classroom environment preferences, teaching styles, and remedial course outcomes. Community College Review, 26(1), 1-19. Morrier, M. J., Irving, M. A., Dandy, E., Dmitriyev, G., & Ukeje, I. C. (2007). Teaching and learning within and across cultures: Educator requirements across the United States. Multicultural Education, 14(3), 32-40

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