School: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Course Number: Math 302 Course Name: Statistics Credit Hours: 3 Credit Hours Length of Course: 16 Weeks Prerequisite: College Algebra (MATH110), or College Trigonometry (MATH111), or Calculus (MATH225) Table of Contents Course Description Evaluation Criteria Course Scope Course Outline Course Objectives Policies Course Delivery Method Academic Services Course Resources Supplemental Materials Evaluation Procedures Course Description (Catalog) This is an interactive course designed to help students achieve a greater understanding of the statistical methods and models available to analyze and solve the wide variety of problems encountered in business, science, medicine, education, the social sciences, and other disciplines. Successful completion of this course will provide students with a working knowledge of the principles of both descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, averages and variations, normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, statistical hypothesis tests, and correlation and regression analyses. The emphasis of the course will be on the proper use of statistical techniques and their application in real life — not on mathematical proofs. This course will use Microsoft Excel for some of the work. Students should have a basic familiarity with Excel and have access to this software application. (Prerequisite: MATH110 or MATH111 or MATH225) Table of Contents Course Scope Successful completion of this course will provide you with a working knowledge of the principles of statistics and enable you to solve problems involving simple probability, averages and variations, normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and the testing of statistical hypotheses. The course is designed for students who seek an understanding of how statistics can be applied in disciplines that require the use of descriptive and inferential statistical methods. The emphasis of the course will be on the proper use of statistical techniques and their implementation rather than on mathematical proofs. However, some mathematics is necessary in order to understand the proper application of the techniques. Thus, you should be familiar with basic mathematics as covered in MATH110 or an equivalent course. Table of Contents Course Objectives After completing the course, the student should be able to: CO-1. Distinguish meaningful statistics from those that are not meaningful. CO-2. Categorize data by type. CO-3. Organize data into tabular form. CO-4. Represent data using frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, ogives, bar charts, Pareto charts, time series graphs, pie charts, box plots, stem and leaf , and other statistical displays.. CO-5. Compute measures of central tendency and measures of variance for quantitative data. CO-6. Explain basic probability theory. CO-7. Examine the outcomes in a sample space using various counting techniques. CO-8. Use the properties of different types of distributions, such as normal, uniform, and binomial to solve problems. CO-9. Compute the mean, variance, and standard deviation of a random variable using the concept of expected value . CO-10. Compute confidence interval estimates for various population parameters. CO-11. Determine the type of hypothesis test to use for different types of data. CO-12. Conduct hypothesis testing procedures for the population mean, the population proportion, the population variance, the population standard deviation, and for the differences between population parameters. CO-13. Use linear regression to model the relationship between two variables. CO-14. Predict the value of a response variable for a given level of an explanatory variable using linear regression. CO-15. Perform Chi-Square tests to determine the goodness of fit of data, the independence of variables, and the homogeneity of population proportions. Table of Contents Course Delivery Method This course, delivered via distance learning, will enable students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system will be made available to each student. The nature of an on-line course requires a significant amount of independent work. The student will be provided with structure, resources, guidance, and feedback for learning the course material. The student, however, is responsible for completing assignments on time, completing the readings, and making inquiries as needed to complete the course effectively. This is a 16-week course, which means the material must be learned in a relatively short period of time. This requires dedication and diligence on the part of the student. Assignments and their due dates are clearly outlined in the Course Outline section of this syllabus. Students are expected to complete all course work on time. Therefore, no extensions or last-minute exceptions are anticipated. Quizzes and exams are due by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on the last day of the week in which they are to be completed. Feedback will be provided by the course instructor, and students are encouraged to seek the instructor’s input via the MESSAGE feature in the classroom or via the Question and Answer Forum, when necessary. It is the responsibility—and obligation—of the student to initiate clarification of course topics in a timely fashion. Learning is not a spectator sport. You must seize the initiative and be proactive! Due to the busy schedules of the students, all work and discussions are asynchronous, meaning you are not required to be on-line at a specific time with the professor or other students. However, the University requires that each student access the classroom at least weekly during the semester. You may use your assignments, a message, a question, or a scheduled contact to fulfill this requirement. Naturally, you should check the course Announcements at the beginning of each week for important course information and reminders. Likewise, you should check the Discussion Forums and contribute to the discussions initiated there. You are, of course, encouraged to interact with other students via the Question and Answer Discussion Forum, or by message at any time. Each student is responsible for the following: • Completely reading the syllabus. If you have any questions about the syllabus or require clarification regarding any aspect of the course, please contact the instructor via message. • Reading the course Announcements for important updates and course information at the beginning of each week. • Checking the Forums in the online classroom and contributing to the discussions initiated there. • Completing assignments on time, including assigned reading and the suggested homework problem sets, on time. The weekly assignments are specified in the Course Outline. Nothing is more detrimental than falling behind, as the course material tends to build on itself as the course progresses. Stay engaged! Stay on task! • Submitting the quizzes, midterm exam, posts to the Forums, and the final exam on time. These are the graded submissions. They must be submitted by 11:55PM Eastern Time on the due date announced by the professor. Typically, late assignments will not be accepted. Table of Contents Course Resources Author Book Title Publication Info ISBN Allan G. Bluman Elementary Statistics, A Step by Step Approach: A Brief Version, 7th edition McGraw-Hill 9781259345289 The book will be delivered to ALL students in the electronic format. The APUS Bookstore distributes VitalSource e-books to APUS students. You must validate your cart to get access to the VitalSource e-book. If this is your first order for a VitalSource e-book, you will receive an order confirmation email from the APUS Bookstore and then a second email with your VitalSource account credentials. Below are links to a tutorial video, FAQs, and tech support contacts to help guide you through this process. • How to validate your cart – video demonstration • How to validate your cart – bookstore information • My EdMap bookstore cart is empty. What happened? • VitalSource video tutorials • VitalSource 24/7 tech support • APUS Bookstore Customer Service (9:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Eastern, Monday-Friday) Email: APUS_Customer_Service@edmap.com Phone: (800) 274-9104 • APUS undergraduate course material support – ecm@apus.edu Print/download options • VitalSource e-books have a print option. You may only be able to print a certain number of pages at a time, but you can continue printing as you wish. • VitalSource e-books can be viewed online or downloaded to a bookshelf. Once downloaded, internet access is not required to read the e-book from the bookshelf. Students will have 1-5 years of access to the online e-book and perpetual access to copies downloaded to the bookshelf. Additional FAQs What if I want the hard copy book instead? Can I get the VitalSource e-book and hard copy book? What books are required for my course? Where is my e-book located? Within our textbook the author refers to an Excel statistical addin called MegaStat. I will not use this software addin. Instead, I will utilize Excel to perform many of the computations in our course. If you are interested see page 29 of our textbook for more information regarding MegaStat. Microsoft Excel is required for this course. Students should have a basic familiarity with Excel and must have access to the 2007 or later version of this software application. In addition to the required course text, the following public domain Websites are useful. Please abide by the university’s academic honesty policy when using Internet sources as well. Note Web site addresses are subject to change. Site Name Website URL/Address Mathematics Videos http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/index.htm Statistics Videos http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm Stat-Soft Supplemental Textbook http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/ Microsoft Mathematics Microsoft Mathematics Hyper Stat Online http://www.davidmlane.com./hyperstat/index.html Calculator website http://www.calculator.com Dr. Math http://mathforum.org/dr.math/ Purple Math http://www.purplemath.com/ Video Tutorials by Michael Sullivan Video Tutorials TCC Making Contact with the Instructor All communications with the instructor should be accomplished via the MESSAGE tool in the Communications section of the classroom. If you are unable to access the classroom because of technical difficulties, you may reach your instructor via the e-mail address provided in the instructor information section of the classroom. However, use of e-mail should be limited to only those situations in which you cannot access the classroom. Otherwise, the MESSAGE tool should be used for all course related correspondence. Table of Contents Evaluation Procedures Staying on task and adhering to the published schedule are typically among the most challenging aspects of completing an academic course successfully. This is especially true for online and part-time non-resident programs. To avoid the pitfall of falling behind, students in this course should complete the assigned reading and review the PowerPoint presentations and videos, which can be accessed via the links in the Lessons section of the online classroom, in a timely manner. Students should also complete the suggested Review Problem Sets as set forth in the schedule provided in the Course Outline of this syllabus. Review Problem Sets will not be graded, but their solutions will be available via the link in the Lessons section of our online classroom. Students should refer to these solutions as a means to confirm their understanding of the topics covered in the Review Problem Sets. Student grades for the course will be based on participation in the forums, five graded quizzes, a midterm exam, and a final exam. Class Participation: Naturally, I value punctuality, familiarity with the required readings, and classroom questions or comments that are relevant and insightful. Whether helping someone understand a point, seeking clarification of a concept you may not completely understand, or contributing to the positive flow of the class discussion based on your experience, it is important for you to realize that learning is an action process—and sharing is a key ingredient in undertaking that process successfully. Therefore, I urge you to participate actively and do your best to contribute to a positive and effective learning environment–for yourself and others. I urge you to utilize the Question and Answer Forum as a means to interact with your classmates. If while working through examples or problems from our textbook you have a question or a comment, please post the question or comment in the Question and Answer Forum. Naturally, I hope that question and answers posted in the Question and Answer Forum will facilitate interactions among the members of our class. Your first required Forum post is the week 1 Introduction Forum. This must be completed by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday during the first week of our course. I will evaluate your responses to the Forums using a 10 point scale, and your contribution to each of the Forums will count as 1.25 percent of the overall course grade, for a total of 10 percent. My evaluation of your participation in our forums will be based on the extent to which you participated and fostered a positive and effective learning environment–for yourself and others. Participating and sharing are the keys. I will post my wrap-up comments for each of our weekly Forums after their due dates. At that time the Forum will be locked and no additional posts will be permitted. Naturally, I urge you to read my wrap-up post, the posts of your classmates, and any summary feedback I provide. If you wish to continue to discuss a topic posed in a Forum that has been locked, you can certainly do so by using the Message tool or the Q&A Forum to interact with the other members of our course. The Week 1 Introduction Forum: During the first week of class each student must make a post to the Week 1 Introduction Forum. You are to use this Forum to introduce yourself and state your goals and objectives as they relate to our course. You are required to make a post to the Week 1 Introduction Forum in order to complete your enrollment in the course. Your post must be at least 250 words, and you must complete it by the end of the first week. This is a university requirement. Quizzes and Examinations: The five graded quiz assignments are dispersed throughout the course. Each quiz will count as 10% of the course grade, the midterm and final exams will each comprise 20% of the course grade. Generally, the exams and quizzes will contain problems similar to those discussed in the suggested homework problems and the many examples given in our textbook. However, you should expect to be challenged by the graded exercises. Exams and quizzes will be conducted as indicated on the course schedule and students are expected to complete them on time. No late submissions will be accepted. Specific instructions will be provided for each examination and quiz in the Lessons section of our classroom at the outset of the week in which these graded exercises are due. Each of these graded exercises is to be completed on an individual basis. You may consult published textbooks, articles, and other printed materials. However, no collaboration is permitted on the examinations or quizzes. You are not to discuss, orally, in print—in any manner—any aspect of the graded exercises with anyone other than your instructor. Clearly, student-teacher relationships are built on trust. This is especially true in the case of an online course. For example, students must trust that teachers have made appropriate decisions about the structure and content of the courses they teach, and teachers must trust that students complete assignments as directed. Acts that violate this trust undermine the educational process and compromise the integrity of the perpetrator. Don’t cheat. Don’t compromise your integrity. To do so invalidates the very purpose which likely motivated you to undertake this course—to learn, to become a better decision maker, to broaden your perspective, and to increase your skill set. At the beginning of the week in which they are due, exams and quizzes will be posted in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. When you are prepared to take an assessment go to the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom and click on the assessment. With the exception of the Final Exam, which is a 3 hour timed exam, all other graded assessments have no time limit. It is important for you to understand that you will be able to submit your answers to an assessment only once. Your answers must be submitted by the 11:55PM Eastern Time deadline, as indicated in the syllabus. I will not accept late submissions. So, please don’t wait until the last minute to submit your answers to a quiz or exam. As soon as you submit your answers your assessment will be graded, and your score will be recorded in the Gradebook. Twenty-four hours after the deadline and once everyone has submitted their answers, you can access the feedback by clicking on the assessment in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Naturally, if you answer any of the questions on an assessment incorrectly I urge you to review the feedback and reconcile any errors you may have made on a quiz or exam. The Final Examination will be worth 25 points and count as 20% of the final grade. It will be a three hour, online, open-book, open-note exam. The final exam will cover all of the material presented during our course. You will be able to access the Final Exam only once. So, be sure to set aside a dedicated three hour period in which to complete it. You may not consult with any other person while taking the exam. The notations used in statistical work aren’t found in many word processing programs, making it difficult to produce many of the symbols used in our course. You may wish to use the Symbol font in Microsoft Word and the Insert/Object/Microsoft Equation feature in Word when preparing documents related to our course. Insert/Symbol is also sometimes useful. Of course, you will also want to familiarize yourself with the Insert/Edit Equation feature contained in the Rich Text Editor that is available in the Rich Text Editor toolbar in our classroom. Additionally, since many of the computations and analyses required in our course can be easily carried out using Microsoft Excel, you may wish to familiarize yourself with the process whereby Excel outputs can be copied and pasted into a Word or pdf file. Table of Contents Evaluation Criteria Grades for the course will be based on the following. Grade Instruments Points Possible % of Final Grade Quiz 1 20 10% Quiz 2 20 10% Quiz 3 20 10% Quiz 4 20 10% Quiz 5 20 10% Graded Forums (8) 80 (10pts each) 10% Mid Term Examination 25 20% Final Examination 25 20% TOTAL 230 100% Students’ final grades will be posted within 7 days of the end of the semester. Students should not telephone the university looking for grades until at least 30 days after the end of the semester. Please see the Student Handbook to reference the University’s grading scale. Table of Contents Course Outline Week Topic(s) Learning Objective(s) Reading(s) Assignment(s) 1 The Nature of Probability and Statistics CO-1, CO-2 Demonstrate knowledge of statistical terms Identify and differentiate between the two branches of statistics Identify types of data Identify sampling techniques Explain the difference between observational and experimental studies Explain how statistics can be used and misused Explain the importance of computers and calculators in statistics Read and study Chapter 1 View the videos: Nature of Statistics and Probability Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Introduce yourself in the Introduction Forum and get to know your classmates. Remember, your post must be at least 250 words and must be posted by 11:55PM Eastern Time on the first Sunday of our course. Respond to at least two other Week 1 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. Suggested Practice Problems: Chapter 1 Review Exercises (p34): 5,6,8,11,13,19,21,29,31,39-43,45-49,51,57 Complete the Chapter 1 Quiz (p36). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Complete the APUS Honor Code and Pledge Assignment. 2 Frequency Distributions and Graphs CO-3 Organize data using frequency distributions Represent data in frequency distributions graphically using histograms, frequency polygons, and ogives Represent data using Pareto charts, time series graphs and pie graphs Draw and interpret a stem and leaf plot Draw and interpret a scatter plot for a set of paired data Read and study Chapter 2 View the videos: Frequency Distributions and Graphs Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 2 Review Exercises (p107): 1,3,11,17,19,27 Complete the Chapter 2 Quiz (p111). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the textbook. Make a post to the Weeks 2-3 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday. 3 Data Description CO-5 Summarize data using measures of central tendency such as the mean, median, mode and midrange Describe data using measures of variation such as the range, variance, and standard deviation Identify the position of a data value in a data set, using various measures of position such as percentiles, deciles and quartiles Use the techniques of exploratory data analysis, including box plots and five number summaries to discover various aspects of data Read and study Chapter 3 View the videos: Data Description Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 3 Review Exercises (p186): 6,16,22,23 Complete the Chapter 3 Quiz (p189). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 2-3 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Complete Quiz #1 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Quiz1_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 4 Probability and Counting Rules CO-6; CO-7 Determine sample spaces and find the probability of an event Find the probability of compound events using addition rules Find the probability of compound events using multiplication rules Find the conditional probability of an event Find the total number of outcomes in a sequence of events using the fundamental counting rule Use the permutation rule to find the number of ways that r objects can be selected from n objects Find the number of ways that r objects can be selected from n objects without regard to order using the combination rule. Find the probability of an event using counting rules Read and study Chapter 4 View the videos: Probability and Counting Rules Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 4 Review Exercises (p255): 2,3,6,15,17,24,27,32,34,39. Complete the Chapter 4 Quiz (p258). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Make a post to the Weeks 4-5 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 5 Discrete Probability Distributions. CO-9 Construct a probability distribution for a random variable Find the mean, variance, standard deviation and expected value for a discrete random variable Find the probability for X successes in n trials of a binomial experiment Find the mean, variance, and standard deviation for the variable of a binomial distribution Read and study Chapter 5 View the videos: Discrete Probability Distributions Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 5 Review Exercises (p298): 1,3,5,8,12,15,20,21. Complete the Chapter 5 Quiz (p300). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 4-5 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Complete Quiz #2 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Quiz2_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 6 The Normal Distribution I CO-8 Identify distributions as symmetric or skewed Identify the properties of a normal distribution Find the area under the standard normal distribution, given various z values Find the probabilities for a normally distributed variable by transforming it into a standard normal distribution Find specific data values for given percentages, using the standard normal distribution Read and study Chapter 6.1- 6.2 View the videos Normal Distribution Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 6 Review Exercises (p354): 1,2,3,4,6,12. Make a post to the Weeks 6-7 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 7 The Normal Distribution II CO-8 Use the central limit theorem to solve problems involving sample means for large samples Use the normal approximation to compute probabilities for a binomial variable Read and study Chapter 6.3-6.4 View the videos Normal Distribution Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 6 Review Exercises (p355): 16, 21. Complete the Chapter 6 Quiz (p356). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 6-7 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 8 Midterm Examination Demonstrate Knowledge of Statistical Concepts Review Chapters 1 – 6 Make a post to the Weeks 8-9 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. Complete the Midterm Exam by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Midterm Exam_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 9 Confidence Intervals and Sample Size CO-10 Find a confidence interval estimate for the population mean when  is known. Determine the sample size for finding a confidence interval for the mean Find a confidence interval estimate for the population mean when  is unknown. Find the confidence interval for a proportion Determine the minimum sample size for finding a confidence interval for a proportion Find a confidence interval for a variance and a standard deviation Read and study Chapter 7 View the videos Confidence Interval & Sample Size Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 7 Review Exercises (p399): 2,5,9,16. Complete the Chapter 7 Quiz (p401). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 8-9 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. Complete Quiz #3 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Quiz3_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 10 Hypothesis Testing I CO-11; C0-12 Understand the definitions used in hypothesis testing State the null & alternate hypotheses Find the critical values for the z test State the five steps used in testing Test means for large samples using the z test Test means for small samples using the t test Read and study Chapter 8-1 to 8-4 View the videos: Hypothesis Testing Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 8 Review Exercises (p470): 3,7,10,11. Make a post to the Weeks 10-11 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 11 Hypothesis Testing II CO-11; CO-12 Test proportions using the z test Test variances or standard deviations using the Chi Square test Test hypotheses using confidence intervals Read and study Chapter 8-5 to 8-6 View the videos: Hypothesis Testing Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 8 Review Exercises (p472): 15,17,18,20. Complete the Chapter 8 Quiz (p473). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 10-11 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. Complete Quiz #4 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Quiz4_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 12 Testing Differences between means, variances and proportions CO-11; CO-12 Test the difference between two population means using the z test Test the difference between two population variances or standard deviations Test the difference between two population means using the t-test Test the difference between two means when using small dependent samples Test the difference between two population proportions Read and study Chapter 9 View the videos: Testing the Differences in Means, Variances, and Proportions Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 9 Review Exercises (p530): 1, 4, 8, and 12. Complete the Chapter 9 Quiz (p532). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Make a post to the Weeks 12-13 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 13 Regression and Correlation CO-13; CO-14 Draw a scatter plot for a set of ordered pairs Compute the correlation coefficient Test the hypothesis: H0:  =0 Compute the equation of the regression line Compute the coefficient of determination Compute the standard error of the estimate Find a predication interval Read and study Chapter 10 View the videos: Regression and Correlation Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 10 Review Exercises (p583): 4 and 8. Complete the Chapter 10 Quiz (p584). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Respond to at least two other Weeks 12-13 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. Complete Quiz #5 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Quiz5_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. 14 Chi-Square Tests and ANOVA CO-15 Conduct Goodness of Fit tests Use Contingency Tables to Test Independence Read and Study Chapter 11.1 – 11.3 View the videos: Hypothesis Testing Videos are located at: http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom Suggested Practice Problems: Complete the following questions in the Chapter 11 Review Exercises (p634): 5,8 and 13. Complete the Chapter 11 Quiz (p636). This does not need to be turned in. It is for your use. Answers are in the text. Make a post to the Weeks 14-15 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 15 Course Review Summarize Course Material Review all course material. Respond to at least two other Weeks 14-15 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY. 16 Final Examination Demonstrate your knowledge of statistics for the analysis of business management decisions Make a post to the optional Week 16 Forum. There is no requirement to respond to others, but you are encouraged to do so. Complete the 3 hour timed, online Final Exam by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday. Access Final Exam_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom. Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once. Table of Contents Policies Please see the Student Handbook to reference all University policies. Quick links to frequently asked question about policies are listed below. Drop/Withdrawal Policy Plagiarism Policy Extension Process and Policy Disability Accommodations Late Assignments Students are expected to submit classroom assignments by the posted due date and to complete the course according to the published class schedule. The due date for each assignment is listed under each assignment. Generally speaking, late work may result in a deduction up to 20% of the grade for each day late, not to exceed 5 days. As a working adult I know your time is limited and often out of your control. Faculty may be more flexible if they know ahead of time of any potential late assignments. Academic Dishonesy Academic dishonesty incorporates more than plagiarism, which is using the work of others without citation. Academic dishonesty includes any use of content purchased or retrieved from web services such as CourseHero.com. Additionally, allowing your work to be place on such web services is academic dishonesty, as it is enabling the dishonesty of others. The copy and pasting of content from any web page, without citation as a direct quote, is academic dishonesty. When in doubt, do not copy/paste, and always cite. Netiquette Online universities promote the advance of knowledge through positive and constructive debate–both inside and outside the classroom. Discussions on the Internet, however, can occasionally degenerate into needless insults and “flaming.” Such activity and the loss of good manners are not acceptable in a university setting–basic academic rules of good behavior and proper “Netiquette” must persist. Remember that you are in a place for the fun and excitement of learning that does not include descent to personal attacks, or student attempts to stifle the discussion of others. • Technology Limitations: While you should feel free to explore the full-range of creative composition in your formal papers, keep e-mail layouts simple. The Sakai classroom may not fully support MIME or HTML encoded messages, which means that bold face, italics, underlining, and a variety of color-coding or other visual effects will not translate in your e-mail messages. • Humor Note: Despite the best of intentions, jokes and–especially–satire can easily get lost or taken seriously. If you feel the need for humor, you may wish to add “emoticons” to help alert your readers: ;-), : ),  Writing Expectations • All students’ work is to be presented with quality and content consistent with this level college course. Grading on forum posts will include adherence to spelling, grammar, and if outside sources are used, proper citation and reference style as indicated below. Citation and Reference Style • All materials should be formatted in APA style. You can find an online APA style guide in the APUS Library. Navigate to APUS Log in » Online Library: CampusGuides » Library Tutorial Center »Writing Help or you can use the link http://apus.campusguides.com/writing/citation and then click on APUS APA Style Guide. • Students can also use RefWorks 2.0 to help output the correct APA citation and APA reference style to be used as part of coursework for this class. RefWorks is an online web-based application that can be accessed through the APUS Online Library. Follow the links for APUS » Online Library: CampusGuides » Library Tutorial Center »RefWorks Help. Disclaimer Statement Course content may vary from the outline to meet the needs of this particular group. Table of Contents Academic Services The Online Library is available to enrolled students and faculty from inside the electronic campus. This is your starting point for access to online books, subscription periodicals, and Web resources that are designed to support your classes and generally not available through search engines on the open Web. In addition, the Online Library provides access to special learning resources, which the University has contracted to assist with your studies. Questions can be directed to librarian@apus.edu. • Charles Town Library and Inter Library Loan: The University maintains a special library with a limited number of supporting volumes, collection of our professors’ publication, and services to search and borrow research books and articles from other libraries. • Electronic Books: You can use the online library to uncover and download over 50,000 titles, which have been scanned and made available in electronic format. • Electronic Journals: The University provides access to over 12,000 journals, which are available in electronic form and only through limited subscription services. • Turnitin.com: Turnitin.com is a tool to improve student research skills that also detects plagiarism. Turnitin.com provides resources on developing topics and assignments that encourage and guide students in producing papers that are intellectually honest, original in thought, and clear in expression. This tool helps ensure a culture of adherence to the University’s standards for intellectual honesty. Turnitin.com also reviews students’ papers for matches with Internet materials and with thousands of student papers in its database, and returns an Originality Report to instructors and/or students. • Tutoring: Students have access to 10 free hours of tutoring service. Tutoring is available in the following subjects: math (basic math through advanced calculus), science (biology, chemistry, and physics), accounting, statistics, economics, Spanish, writing, grammar, and more. Additional information is located in the Online Research Center. Students may have access to some free hours of tutoring service per year depending on their affiliation. If you are Active Duty DOD Military (and their dependents), please go to the Online Library Tutorial page to link directly to your branch of service to start your online tutoring with Tutor.com: http://www.tutor.com/military/colleges/amu-apus All other students (non-active duty DOD military) who have NOT used Smarthinking but are interested in online tutoring, please go to the Online Library Tutorial page to link to the AMU/APU Civilian & CG Military Tutor.com portal at http://www.tutor.com/colleges/landing/apus Detailed information regarding tutor.com is located in the Online Library on the Tutorial & Student Study Center page. http://www.apus.edu/online-library/tutorials/index.htm Any questions regarding online tutoring should be emailed to librarian@apus.edu. The library staff is available 7 days a week for about 18 hours a day (in shifts). Table of Contents Supplemental Materials The following links are to online tutorials for this class. You may click on the links directly to view the discussion. http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/index.htm Nature of Statistics and Probability • Data Distributions — types of data • Inference — What is it? • Random Variables — definitions • Sampling — How to select valid samples • Sampling — Invalid Types • Sampling — Random Samples • Sampling — Valid Types Frequency Distributions and Graphs • Bar Graph • Dot plot • Frequency Polygon • Histogram • Ogive • Pareto Chart • Pie Chart • Stem-and-Leaf Plot • Time Series Plot Data Description • Comparing two data distributions • Data Distributions — calculating a trimmed mean • Data Distributions — calculating mean and median • Data Distributions — calculating range and interquartile range • Data Distributions — calculating variance and standard deviation • Data Distributions — Chebyshev’s Theorem • Data Distributions — definition • Data Distributions — measures of central tendency • Data Distributions — measures of dispersion (spread) • Data Distributions — modified box plots • Data Distributions — resistant statistics Probability and Counting Rules • Continuous probability distribution calculations • Probability — calc probabilities from relative frequency distributions • Probability — definition and properties • Probability — Independent versus Disjoint • Probability — intersection of events • Probability — tree diagram (1) • Probability — tree diagram (2) • Probability — union of events • Probability — using properties of probability • Probability Distributions – definitions Discrete Probability Distributions • Binomial Probability Calculation • Binomial Probability Distribution • Binomial, Geometric, and Poisson – definitions • Confidence Interval for a Population Proportion • Discrete probability distribution calculations • Mean and standard deviations of a discrete probability distribution • Sampling Distribution of Sample Proportion Normal Distribution • Central Limit Theorem • Normal Distribution — Empirical Rule • Normal Distribution — Empirical Rule (example) • Normal Distribution — Finding data value given percentile • Normal Distribution — Finding percentile • Normal Distribution — Probability Calculation using calculator • Normal Distribution — Probability Calculation using table • Normal Distribution – Properties • Normal Distribution — Standard Normal Distribution • Sampling Distribution of Sample Mean from Normal Population • Z-scores • Z-scores — finding raw data value from z-score • Z-scores — finding standard deviation from z-score • Z-scores — who scored better? Confidence Interval and Sample Size • Confidence Interval for mean (sigma known) • Confidence Interval for mean (sigma unknown) • Confidence Intervals — Finding z-critical values • Confidence intervals — when can you use? • Confidence intervals compare width of z with t • Confidence Intervals –Finding t-critical values • Recipe for a Confidence Interval • Sample Size Calculation (CI for p) • Widths of confidence intervals Hypothesis Testing • Chi-square confidence interval for population variance • Chi-square confidence interval for population variance example • Chi-square distributions • Chi-square goodness-of-fit test example • Chi-square test of homogeneity example • Chi-square test of homogeneity example (calculator) • Chi-square test of independence example • Chi-square test of independence example (calculator) • Chi-square test of population variance example • Differences between normal and t-distributions • Recipe for a Significance Test • Sign Test for a population Proportion using Calculator • Significance Test for a Population Proportion • Tests requiring the Chi-square distribution Testing the Differences in Means, Variances and Proportions • Significance test for mean (sigma known) • Significance test for mean (sigma known) using calculator • Significance test for mean (sigma unknown) • Significance test for mean (sigma unknown) using calculator Regression and Correlation • Regression – Assumptions • Regression — Calculating Correlation Coefficient • Regression – Confidence Interval for a Predicted y • Regression – Confidence Interval for Slope (Beta) • Regression — Correlation Coefficient Definition and Properties • Regression — Example from Start to Finish • Regression — Graphing a Residual Plot • Regression – Prediction • Regression — Residual Plot Definitions and Properties • Regression – Scatter plot • Regression — Test of Significance for Rho Population Correlation • Regression — Test of Significance for Slope Beta • Regression — What is it? Table of Contents

 
 
School:                        Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Course Number:       Math 302

Course Name:            Statistics

Credit Hours:            3 Credit Hours

Length of Course:     16 Weeks

Prerequisite:              College Algebra (MATH110), or College                                                                  Trigonometry (MATH111), or Calculus                                                                     (MATH225)

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Course Description Evaluation Criteria
Course Scope Course Outline
Course Objectives Policies
Course Delivery Method Academic Services
Course Resources Supplemental Materials
Evaluation Procedures  

 

 

Course Description (Catalog)

This is an interactive course designed to help students achieve a greater understanding of the statistical methods and models available to analyze and solve the wide variety of problems encountered in business, science, medicine, education, the social sciences, and other disciplines. Successful completion of this course will provide students with a working knowledge of the principles of both descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, averages and variations, normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, statistical hypothesis tests, and correlation and regression analyses. The emphasis of the course will be on the proper use of statistical techniques and their application in real life — not on mathematical proofs. This course will use Microsoft Excel for some of the work. Students should have a basic familiarity with Excel and have access to this software application. (Prerequisite: MATH110 or MATH111 or MATH225)

Table of Contents

Course Scope

 

Successful completion of this course will provide you with a working knowledge of the principles of statistics and enable you to solve problems involving simple probability, averages and variations, normal probability distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and the testing of statistical hypotheses.  The course is designed for students who seek an understanding of how statistics can be applied in disciplines that require the use of descriptive and inferential statistical methods.  The emphasis of the course will be on the proper use of statistical techniques and their implementation rather than on mathematical proofs.  However, some mathematics is necessary in order to understand the proper application of the techniques.  Thus, you should be familiar with basic mathematics as covered in MATH110 or an equivalent course.

Table of Contents

 

Course Objectives

 

After completing the course, the student should be able to:

 

CO-1.   Distinguish meaningful statistics from those that are not meaningful.

CO-2.   Categorize data by type.

CO-3.   Organize data into tabular form.

CO-4.   Represent data using frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, ogives, bar charts, Pareto charts, time series graphs, pie charts, box plots, stem and leaf , and other statistical displays..

CO-5.   Compute measures of central tendency and measures of variance for quantitative data.

CO-6.   Explain basic probability theory.

CO-7.   Examine the outcomes in a sample space using various counting techniques.

CO-8.   Use the properties of different types of distributions, such as normal, uniform, and binomial to solve problems.

CO-9.   Compute the mean, variance, and standard deviation of a random variable using the concept of expected value .

CO-10. Compute confidence interval estimates for various population parameters.

CO-11. Determine the type of hypothesis test to use for different types of data.

CO-12. Conduct hypothesis testing procedures for the population mean, the population proportion, the population variance, the population standard deviation, and for the differences between population parameters.

CO-13. Use linear regression to model the relationship between two variables.

CO-14. Predict the value of a response variable for a given level of an explanatory variable using linear regression.

CO-15. Perform Chi-Square tests to determine the goodness of fit of data, the independence of variables, and the homogeneity of population proportions.

Table of Contents

 

Course Delivery Method

This course, delivered via distance learning, will enable students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system will be made available to each student.

The nature of an on-line course requires a significant amount of independent work. The student will be provided with structure, resources, guidance, and feedback for learning the course material. The student, however, is responsible for completing assignments on time, completing the readings, and making inquiries as needed to complete the course effectively.  This is a 16-week course, which means the material must be learned in a relatively short period of time. This requires dedication and diligence on the part of the student.

Assignments and their due dates are clearly outlined in the Course Outline section of this syllabus.  Students are expected to complete all course work on time.  Therefore, no extensions or last-minute exceptions are anticipated.  Quizzes and exams are due by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on the last day of the week in which they are to be completed.  Feedback will be provided by the course instructor, and students are encouraged to seek the instructor’s input via the MESSAGE feature in the classroom or via the Question and Answer Forum, when necessary.  It is the responsibility—and obligation—of the student to initiate clarification of course topics in a timely fashion.  Learning is not a spectator sport.  You must seize the initiative and be proactive!

Due to the busy schedules of the students, all work and discussions are asynchronous, meaning you are not required to be on-line at a specific time with the professor or other students.   However, the University requires that each student access the classroom at least weekly during the semester.  You may use your assignments, a message, a question, or a scheduled contact to fulfill this requirement.  Naturally, you should check the course Announcements at the beginning of each week for important course information and reminders.  Likewise, you should check the Discussion Forums and contribute to the discussions initiated there.  You are, of course, encouraged to interact with other students via the Question and Answer Discussion Forum, or by message at any time.

 

Each student is responsible for the following:

 

  • Completely reading the syllabus. If you have any questions about the syllabus or require clarification regarding any aspect of the course, please contact the instructor via message.
  • Reading the course Announcements for important updates and course information at the beginning of each week.
  • Checking the Forums in the online classroom and contributing to the discussions initiated there.
  • Completing assignments on time, including assigned reading and the suggested homework problem sets, on time. The weekly assignments are specified in the Course Outline. Nothing is more detrimental than falling behind, as the course material tends to build on itself as the course progresses.  Stay engaged!  Stay on task!
  • Submitting the quizzes, midterm exam, posts to the Forums, and the final exam on time. These are the graded submissions. They must be submitted by 11:55PM Eastern Time on the due date announced by the professor.  Typically, late assignments will not be accepted.

Table of Contents

 

Course Resources

 

 Author Book Title Publication Info ISBN
Allan G. Bluman Elementary Statistics, A Step by Step Approach: A Brief Version, 7th edition McGraw-Hill 9781259345289

 

The book will be delivered to ALL students in the electronic format. The APUS Bookstore distributes VitalSource e-books to APUS students.  You must validate your cart to get access to the VitalSource e-book.  If this is your first order for a VitalSource e-book, you will receive an order confirmation email from the APUS Bookstore and then a second email with your VitalSource account credentials.  Below are links to a tutorial video, FAQs, and tech support contacts to help guide you through this process.

Email: APUS_Customer_Service@edmap.com

Phone: (800) 274-9104

  • APUS undergraduate course material support – ecm@apus.edu

Print/download options

  • VitalSource e-books have a print option. You may only be able to print a certain number of pages at a time, but you can continue printing as you wish.
  • VitalSource e-books can be viewed online or downloaded to a bookshelf. Once downloaded, internet access is not required to read the e-book from the bookshelf.   Students will have 1-5 years of access to the online e-book and perpetual access to copies downloaded to the bookshelf.

Additional FAQs

What if I want the hard copy book instead?

Can I get the VitalSource e-book and hard copy book?

What books are required for my course?

Where is my e-book located?

Within our textbook the author refers to an Excel statistical addin called MegaStat. I will not use this software addin. Instead, I will utilize Excel to perform many of the computations in our course. If you are interested see page 29 of our textbook for more information regarding MegaStat.

Microsoft Excel is required for this course.  Students should have a basic familiarity with Excel and must have access to the 2007 or later version of this software application.

In addition to the required course text, the following public domain Websites are useful.  Please abide by the university’s academic honesty policy when using Internet sources as well. Note Web site addresses are subject to change.

Site Name Website URL/Address
Mathematics Videos   http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/index.htm
Statistics Videos http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm
Stat-Soft Supplemental Textbook   http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/
Microsoft Mathematics   Microsoft Mathematics
Hyper Stat Online   http://www.davidmlane.com./hyperstat/index.html
Calculator website   http://www.calculator.com
Dr. Math   http://mathforum.org/dr.math/
Purple Math   http://www.purplemath.com/
Video Tutorials by Michael Sullivan Video Tutorials TCC

 

Making Contact with the Instructor

All communications with the instructor should be accomplished via the MESSAGE tool in the Communications section of the classroom.   If you are unable to access the classroom because of technical difficulties, you may reach your instructor via the e-mail address provided in the instructor information section of the classroom.  However, use of e-mail should be limited to only those situations in which you cannot access the classroom.  Otherwise, the MESSAGE tool should be used for all course related correspondence.

Table of Contents

 

Evaluation Procedures

 

Staying on task and adhering to the published schedule are typically among the most challenging aspects of completing an academic course successfully.  This is especially true for online and part-time non-resident programs.  To avoid the pitfall of falling behind, students in this course should complete the assigned reading and review the PowerPoint presentations and videos, which can be accessed via the links in the Lessons section of the online classroom, in a timely manner.  Students should also complete the suggested Review Problem Sets as set forth in the schedule provided in the Course Outline of this syllabus.  Review Problem Sets will not be graded, but their solutions will be available via the link in the Lessons section of our online classroom.  Students should refer to these solutions as a means to confirm their understanding of the topics covered in the Review Problem Sets.

 

Student grades for the course will be based on participation in the forums, five graded quizzes, a midterm exam, and a final exam.

 

Class Participation:  Naturally, I value punctuality, familiarity with the required readings, and classroom questions or comments that are relevant and insightful.  Whether helping someone understand a point, seeking clarification of a concept you may not completely understand, or contributing to the positive flow of the class discussion based on your experience, it is important for you to realize that learning is an action process—and sharing is a key ingredient in undertaking that process successfully.  Therefore, I urge you to participate actively and do your best to contribute to a positive and effective learning environment–for yourself and others.

 

I urge you to utilize the Question and Answer Forum as a means to interact with your classmates.  If while working through examples or problems from our textbook you have a question or a comment, please post the question or comment in the Question and Answer Forum.  Naturally, I hope that question and answers posted in the Question and Answer Forum will facilitate interactions among the members of our class.

 

Your first required Forum post is the week 1 Introduction Forum.  This must be completed by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday during the first week of our course.  I will evaluate your responses to the Forums using a 10 point scale, and your contribution to each of the Forums will count as 1.25 percent of the overall course grade, for a total of 10 percent.  My evaluation of your participation in our forums will be based on the extent to which you participated and fostered a positive and effective learning environment–for yourself and others.  Participating and sharing are the keys.  I will post my wrap-up comments for each of our weekly Forums after their due dates.  At that time the Forum will be locked and no additional posts will be permitted.  Naturally, I urge you to read my wrap-up post, the posts of your classmates, and any summary feedback I provide.  If you wish to continue to discuss a topic posed in a Forum that has been locked, you can certainly do so by using the Message tool or the Q&A Forum to interact with the other members of our course.

 

The Week 1 Introduction Forum:  During the first week of class each student must make a post to the Week 1 Introduction Forum.  You are to use this Forum to introduce yourself and state your goals and objectives as they relate to our course.  You are required to make a post to the Week 1 Introduction Forum in order to complete your enrollment in the course.  Your post must be at least 250 words, and you must complete it by the end of the first week.  This is a university requirement.

 

 

Quizzes and Examinations:  The five graded quiz assignments are dispersed throughout the course. Each quiz will count as 10% of the course grade, the midterm and final exams will each comprise 20% of the course grade. Generally, the exams and quizzes will contain problems similar to those discussed in the suggested homework problems and the many examples given in our textbook. However, you should expect to be challenged by the graded exercises. Exams and quizzes will be conducted as indicated on the course schedule and students are expected to complete them on time. No late submissions will be accepted.

 

Specific instructions will be provided for each examination and quiz in the Lessons section of our classroom at the outset of the week in which these graded exercises are due. Each of these graded exercises is to be completed on an individual basis. You may consult published textbooks, articles, and other printed materials. However, no collaboration is permitted on the examinations or quizzes. You are not to discuss, orally, in print—in any manner—any aspect of the graded exercises with anyone other than your instructor. Clearly, student-teacher relationships are built on trust. This is especially true in the case of an online course. For example, students must trust that teachers have made appropriate decisions about the structure and content of the courses they teach, and teachers must trust that students complete assignments as directed. Acts that violate this trust undermine the educational process and compromise the integrity of the perpetrator. Don’t cheat. Don’t compromise your integrity. To do so invalidates the very purpose which likely motivated you to undertake this course—to learn, to become a better decision maker, to broaden your perspective, and to increase your skill set.

 

At the beginning of the week in which they are due, exams and quizzes will be posted in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  When you are prepared to take an assessment go to the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom and click on the assessment.  With the exception of the Final Exam, which is a 3 hour timed exam, all other graded assessments have no time limit.  It is important for you to understand that you will be able to submit your answers to an assessment only once. Your answers must be submitted by the 11:55PM Eastern Time deadline, as indicated in the syllabus.  I will not accept late submissions. So, please don’t wait until the last minute to submit your answers to a quiz or exam. As soon as you submit your answers your assessment will be graded, and your score will be recorded in the Gradebook.  Twenty-four hours after the deadline and once everyone has submitted their answers, you can access the feedback by clicking on the assessment in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Naturally, if you answer any of the questions on an assessment incorrectly I urge you to review the feedback and reconcile any errors you may have made on a quiz or exam.

 

The Final Examination will be worth 25 points and count as 20% of the final grade. It will be a three hour, online, open-book, open-note exam. The final exam will cover all of the material presented during our course.  You will be able to access the Final Exam only once. So, be sure to set aside a dedicated three hour period in which to complete it.  You may not consult with any other person while taking the exam.

The notations used in statistical work aren’t found in many word processing programs, making it difficult to produce many of the symbols used in our course. You may wish to use the Symbol font in Microsoft Word and the Insert/Object/Microsoft Equation feature in Word when preparing documents related to our course.  Insert/Symbol is also sometimes useful.  Of course, you will also want to familiarize yourself with the Insert/Edit Equation feature contained in the Rich Text Editor that is available in the Rich Text Editor toolbar in our classroom.  Additionally, since many of the computations and analyses required in our course can be easily carried out using Microsoft Excel, you may wish to familiarize yourself with the process whereby Excel outputs can be copied and pasted into a Word or pdf file.

Table of Contents

 

Evaluation Criteria

 

Grades for the course will be based on the following.

 

Grade Instruments Points Possible % of Final Grade
Quiz 1 20 10%
Quiz 2 20 10%
Quiz 3 20 10%
Quiz 4 20 10%
Quiz 5 20 10%
Graded Forums (8)                      80 (10pts each) 10%
Mid Term Examination 25 20%
Final Examination 25 20%
TOTAL 230 100%

 

Students’ final grades will be posted within 7 days of the end of the semester.  Students should not telephone the university looking for grades until at least 30 days after the end of the semester.

Please see the Student Handbook to reference the University’s grading scale.

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

 

Course Outline

 

Week

 

Topic(s)

 

Learning Objective(s) Reading(s)

 

Assignment(s)

 

1 The Nature of Probability and Statistics CO-1, CO-2

Demonstrate knowledge of statistical terms
Identify and differentiate between the two branches of statistics
Identify types of data
Identify sampling techniques
Explain the difference between observational and experimental studies
Explain how statistics can be used and misused

 

Explain the importance of computers and calculators in statistics

Read and study Chapter 1

 

View the videos:

Nature of Statistics and Probability

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Introduce yourself in the Introduction Forum and get to know your classmates.  Remember, your post must be at least 250 words and must be posted by 11:55PM Eastern Time on the first Sunday of our course.

 

Respond to at least two other Week 1 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

Suggested Practice Problems:

Chapter 1 Review Exercises (p34): 5,6,8,11,13,19,21,29,31,39-43,45-49,51,57

 

Complete the Chapter 1 Quiz (p36). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Complete the APUS Honor Code and Pledge Assignment.

 

2 Frequency Distributions and Graphs  CO-3

Organize data using frequency distributions

 

Represent data in frequency distributions graphically using histograms, frequency polygons, and ogives

 

Represent data using Pareto charts, time series graphs and pie graphs

 

Draw and interpret a stem and leaf plot

 

Draw and interpret a scatter plot for a set of paired data

Read and study Chapter 2

 

View the videos:

Frequency Distributions and Graphs

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 2 Review Exercises (p107): 1,3,11,17,19,27

 

 

 

 

Complete the Chapter 2 Quiz (p111). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use.  Answers are in the textbook.

 

Make a post to the Weeks 2-3 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

3 Data Description CO-5

Summarize data using measures of central tendency such as the mean, median, mode and midrange

 

Describe data using measures of variation such as the range, variance, and standard deviation

 

Identify the position of a data value in a data set, using various measures of position such as percentiles, deciles and quartiles

 

Use the techniques of exploratory data analysis, including box plots and five number summaries to discover various aspects of data

Read and study Chapter 3

 

View the videos:

Data Description

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 3 Review Exercises (p186):  6,16,22,23

 

Complete the Chapter 3 Quiz (p189). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 2-3 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Complete Quiz #1 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Quiz1_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

4 Probability and Counting Rules CO-6; CO-7

Determine sample spaces and find the probability  of an event

 

Find the probability of compound events using addition rules

 

Find the probability of compound events using multiplication rules

 

Find the conditional probability of an event

 

Find the total number of outcomes in a sequence of events using the fundamental counting rule

 

Use the permutation rule to find the number of ways that r objects can be selected from n objects

 

Find the number of ways that r objects can be selected from n objects without regard to order using the combination rule.

 

Find the probability of an event using counting rules

Read and study Chapter 4

 

View the videos:

Probability and Counting Rules

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 4 Review Exercises (p255): 2,3,6,15,17,24,27,32,34,39.

 

Complete the Chapter 4 Quiz (p258).  This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Make a post to the Weeks 4-5 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

5 Discrete Probability Distributions. CO-9

Construct a probability distribution for a random variable

 

Find the mean, variance, standard deviation and expected value for a discrete random variable

 

Find the probability for X successes in n trials of a binomial experiment

 

Find the mean, variance, and standard deviation for the variable of a binomial distribution

 

Read and study Chapter 5

 

View the videos:

Discrete Probability Distributions

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 5 Review Exercises (p298): 1,3,5,8,12,15,20,21.

 

Complete the Chapter 5 Quiz (p300). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 4-5 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Complete Quiz #2 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Quiz2_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

6 The Normal Distribution I CO-8

Identify distributions as symmetric or skewed

 

Identify the properties of a normal distribution

 

Find the area under the standard normal distribution, given various z values

 

Find the probabilities for a normally distributed variable by transforming it into a standard normal distribution

 

Find specific data values for given percentages, using the standard normal distribution

Read and study Chapter 6.1- 6.2

 

View the videos

Normal Distribution

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

 

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 6 Review Exercises (p354): 1,2,3,4,6,12.

 

Make a post to the Weeks 6-7 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

 

 

7 The Normal Distribution II CO-8

Use the central limit theorem to solve problems involving sample means for large samples

 

Use the normal approximation to compute probabilities for a binomial variable

 

Read and study Chapter 6.3-6.4

 

View the videos

Normal Distribution

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 6 Review Exercises (p355): 16, 21.

 

Complete the Chapter 6 Quiz (p356). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 6-7 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

8 Midterm Examination Demonstrate Knowledge of Statistical Concepts Review Chapters

1 – 6

Make a post to the Weeks 8-9 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

Complete the Midterm Exam by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Midterm Exam_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

9 Confidence Intervals and Sample Size CO-10

Find a confidence interval estimate for the population mean when s is known.

 

Determine the sample size for finding a confidence interval for the mean

 

Find a confidence interval estimate for the population mean when s is unknown.

 

Find the confidence interval for a proportion

 

Determine the minimum sample size for finding a confidence interval for a proportion

 

Find a confidence interval for a variance and a standard deviation

Read and study Chapter 7

 

View the videos

Confidence Interval & Sample Size

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 7 Review Exercises (p399): 2,5,9,16.

 

Complete the Chapter 7 Quiz (p401). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 8-9 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

Complete Quiz #3 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Quiz3_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

 

10 Hypothesis Testing I CO-11; C0-12

Understand the definitions used in hypothesis testing

 

State the null & alternate hypotheses

 

Find the critical values for the z test

 

State the five steps used in testing

 

Test means for large samples using the z test

 

Test means for small samples using the t test

 

Read and study Chapter 8-1 to 8-4

 

View the videos:

Hypothesis Testing

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 8 Review Exercises (p470):  3,7,10,11.

 

Make a post to the Weeks 10-11 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

11 Hypothesis Testing II CO-11; CO-12

Test proportions using the z test

 

Test variances or standard deviations using the Chi Square test

 

Test hypotheses using confidence intervals

Read and study Chapter 8-5 to 8-6

 

View the videos:

Hypothesis Testing

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 8 Review Exercises (p472): 15,17,18,20.

 

Complete the Chapter 8 Quiz (p473). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 10-11 Forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

Complete Quiz #4 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Quiz4_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

 

12 Testing Differences between means, variances and proportions CO-11; CO-12

Test the difference between two population  means using the z test

 

Test the difference between two population variances or standard deviations

 

Test the difference between two population means using the t-test

 

Test the difference between two means when using small dependent samples

 

Test the difference between two population proportions

Read and study Chapter 9

 

View the videos:

Testing the Differences in Means, Variances, and Proportions

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 9 Review Exercises (p530): 1, 4, 8, and 12.

 

Complete the Chapter 9 Quiz (p532). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

 

 

Make a post to the Weeks 12-13 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

13 Regression and Correlation CO-13; CO-14

Draw a scatter plot for a set of ordered pairs

 

Compute the correlation coefficient

 

Test the hypothesis: H0: r =0

Compute the equation of the regression line

 

Compute the coefficient of determination

 

Compute the standard error of the estimate

 

Find a predication interval

 

Read and study Chapter 10

 

View the videos:

Regression and Correlation

 

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 10 Review Exercises (p583): 4 and 8.

 

Complete the Chapter 10 Quiz (p584). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Respond to at least two other Weeks 12-13 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

 

Complete Quiz #5 by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Quiz5_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

 

14  

Chi-Square Tests and

ANOVA

CO-15

Conduct Goodness of Fit tests

 

Use Contingency Tables to Test Independence

Read and Study Chapter 11.1 – 11.3

 

View the videos:

Hypothesis Testing

 

Videos are located at:

http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/statistics.htm

 

 

View and study the PowerPoint presentation in the Lessons section of the classroom

Suggested Practice Problems:

Complete the following questions in the Chapter 11 Review Exercises (p634): 5,8 and 13.

 

Complete the Chapter 11 Quiz (p636). This does not need to be turned in.  It is for your use. Answers are in the text.

 

Make a post to the Weeks 14-15 Forum by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.

15 Course Review Summarize Course Material Review all course material. Respond to at least two other Weeks 14-15 forum posts by 11:55PM Eastern Time on SUNDAY.
16 Final Examination Demonstrate your knowledge  of statistics for the analysis of business management decisions   Make a post to the optional Week 16 Forum.  There is no requirement to respond to others, but you are encouraged to do so.

 

Complete the 3 hour timed, online Final Exam by 11:55 PM Eastern Time on Sunday.

 

Access Final Exam_MATH302 in the Tests & Quizzes section of our classroom.  Remember you will be able to submit your answers only once.

Table of Contents

Policies

 

Please see the Student Handbook to reference all University policies. Quick links to frequently asked question about policies are listed below.

 

Drop/Withdrawal Policy

Plagiarism Policy

Extension Process and Policy

Disability Accommodations

 

Late Assignments

 

Students are expected to submit classroom assignments by the posted due date and to complete the course according to the published class schedule.  The due date for each assignment is listed under each assignment. Generally speaking, late work may result in a deduction up to 20% of the grade for each day late, not to exceed 5 days.  As a working adult I know your time is limited and often out of your control. Faculty may be more flexible if they know ahead of time of any potential late assignments.

 

Academic Dishonesy

 

Academic dishonesty incorporates more than plagiarism, which is using the work of others without citation.  Academic dishonesty includes any use of content purchased or retrieved from web services such as CourseHero.com.  Additionally, allowing your work to be place on such web services is academic dishonesty, as it is enabling the dishonesty of others.  The copy and pasting of content from any web page, without citation as a direct quote, is academic dishonesty.  When in doubt, do not copy/paste, and always cite.

 

Netiquette

 

Online universities promote the advance of knowledge through positive and constructive debate–both inside and outside the classroom. Discussions on the Internet, however, can occasionally degenerate into needless insults and “flaming.” Such activity and the loss of good manners are not acceptable in a university setting–basic academic rules of good behavior and proper “Netiquette” must persist.  Remember that you are in a place for the fun and excitement of learning that does not include descent to personal attacks, or student attempts to stifle the discussion of others.

 

  • Technology Limitations: While you should feel free to explore the full-range of creative composition in your formal papers, keep e-mail layouts simple. The Sakai classroom may not fully support MIME or HTML encoded messages, which means that bold face, italics, underlining, and a variety of color-coding or other visual effects will not translate in your e-mail messages.
  • Humor Note: Despite the best of intentions, jokes and–especially–satire can easily get lost or taken seriously. If you feel the need for humor, you may wish to add “emoticons” to help alert your readers: ;-),  : ),  J

 

Writing Expectations

  • All students’ work is to be presented with quality and content consistent with this level college course. Grading on forum posts will include adherence to spelling, grammar, and if outside sources are used, proper citation and reference style as indicated below.

Citation and Reference Style

  • All materials should be formatted in APA style. You can find an online APA style guide in the APUS Library. Navigate to APUS Log in » Online Library: CampusGuides » Library Tutorial Center »Writing Help or you can use the link http://apus.campusguides.com/writing/citation and then click on APUS APA Style Guide.
  • Studentscan also use RefWorks 2.0 to help output the correct APA citation and APA reference style to be used as part of coursework for this class. RefWorks is an online web-based application that can be accessed through the APUS Online Library.  Follow the links for APUS » Online Library: CampusGuides » Library Tutorial Center »RefWorks Help.

Disclaimer Statement

 

Course content may vary from the outline to meet the needs of this particular group.

 

Table of Contents

 

Academic Services

The Online Library is available to enrolled students and faculty from inside the electronic campus. This is your starting point for access to online books, subscription periodicals, and Web resources that are designed to support your classes and generally not available through search engines on the open Web. In addition, the Online Library provides access to special learning resources, which the University has contracted to assist with your studies. Questions can be directed to librarian@apus.edu.

  • Charles Town Library and Inter Library Loan: The University maintains a special library with a limited number of supporting volumes, collection of our professors’ publication, and services to search and borrow research books and articles from other libraries.
  • Electronic Books: You can use the online library to uncover and download over 50,000 titles, which have been scanned and made available in electronic format.
  • Electronic Journals: The University provides access to over 12,000 journals, which are available in electronic form and only through limited subscription services.
  • com: Turnitin.com is a tool to improve student research skills that also detects plagiarism. Turnitin.com provides resources on developing topics and assignments that encourage and guide students in producing papers that are intellectually honest, original in thought, and clear in expression. This tool helps ensure a culture of adherence to the University’s standards for intellectual honesty. Turnitin.com also reviews students’ papers for matches with Internet materials and with thousands of student papers in its database, and returns an Originality Report to instructors and/or students.
  • Tutoring: Students have access to 10 free hours of tutoring service. Tutoring is available in the following subjects: math (basic math through advanced calculus), science (biology, chemistry, and physics), accounting, statistics, economics, Spanish, writing, grammar, and more. Additional information is located in the Online Research Center. Students may have access to some free hours of tutoring service per year depending on their affiliation. If you are Active Duty DOD Military (and their dependents), please go to the Online Library Tutorial page to link directly to your branch of service to start your  online tutoring with Tutor.com:  http://www.tutor.com/military/colleges/amu-apus   All other students (non-active duty DOD military) who have NOT used Smarthinking but are interested in online tutoring, please go  to the Online Library Tutorial page to link to the AMU/APU Civilian & CG Military Tutor.com portal at http://www.tutor.com/colleges/landing/apus

 

Detailed information regarding tutor.com is located in the Online Library on the Tutorial & Student Study Center page.

http://www.apus.edu/online-library/tutorials/index.htm

Any questions regarding online tutoring should be emailed to librarian@apus.edu. The library staff is available 7 days a week for about 18 hours a day (in shifts).

Table of Contents

Supplemental Materials

 

The following links are to online tutorials for this class. You may click on the links directly to view the discussion.  http://www.apus.edu/media/mathWV/index.htm

Nature of Statistics and Probability

Frequency Distributions and Graphs

Data Description

Probability and Counting Rules

Discrete Probability Distributions

Normal Distribution

Confidence Interval and Sample Size

Hypothesis Testing

Testing the Differences in Means, Variances and Proportions

Regression and Correlation

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